หมอรีบปลุกให้รู้ตัว อย่าประมาทนอนกรน เป็นภัยต่อสุขภาพตนหนักในวันข้างหน้า

Snorers are more likely to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery that supplies the brain with oxygenated blood

Snorers are more likely to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery that supplies the brain with oxygenated blood

นักวิจัยโรงพยาบาลเฮนรีี่ ฟอร์ดของสหรัฐฯ บอกเตือนอย่างแรงว่า อย่าไปดูถูกการนอนกรนว่า แค่เป็นการก่อความรำคาญเท่านั้น แต่ที่จริงแล้ว มันอาจก่อภัยให้กับสุขภาพในวันหน้าได้ยิ่งกว่าความอ้วน การสูบบุหรี่และมีไขมันในเลือดสูง เพราะว่ามันทำให้เส้นเลือดเลี้ยงสมองด้านหน้าหรือผิดปกติไปได้ ซึ่งการที่เยื่อบุเส้นเลือดใหญ่นำออกซิเจนไปเลี้ยงสมองหน้านั้น เท่ากับเป็นลางร้ายบอกให้รู้การมาถึงของโรคหลอดเลือดทั้งหลาย

หมอโรเบิร์ต ดีบ หมอโสตศอนาสิกวิทยา กล่าวว่า ไม่ควรประมาทการนอนกรนเป็นอันขาด ควรจะเริ่มรักษามัน เช่นเดียวกับความดันโลหิตสูง การหยุดหายใจระหว่างหลับและปัจจัยเสี่ยงของโรคหัวใจและหลอดเลือดอื่นๆ

เขาได้พบในการศึกษาว่า ผลจากการนอนกรนทำให้เส้นเลือดเลี้ยงสมองกระทบกระเทือนได้ แม้ว่าจะยังไม่ถึงหยุดหายใจระหว่างนอนหลับ อาจจะเป็นเพราะการสั่นไหวของการนอนกรน ทำให้เกิดการอักเสบขึ้น การหยุดหายใจขณะหลับเป็นพัก เป็นอาการของโรคของการนอนอย่างหนึ่ง เกิดจากท่อทางเดินหายใจอุดตัน ทำให้กรนดังและหยุดหายใจเป็นพัก รู้กันว่าเกี่ยวพันกับโรคหัวใจและหลอดเลือด รวมกับภัยต่อสุขภาพร้ายแรงอื่นๆ นานแล้ว.

ที่มา : ไทยรัฐ 6 กุมภาพันธ์ 2556

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Related Article:

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Snoring May Be Early Sign of Future Health Risks

 

MEDIA CONTACT:
Krista Hopson
khopson1@hfhs.org

Jan. 24, 2012

DETROIT – Here’s a wake-up call for snorers: Snoring may put you at a greater risk than those who are overweight, smoke or have high cholesterol to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

The increased thickening in the lining of the two large blood vessels that supply the brain with oxygenated blood is a precursor to atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries responsible for many vascular diseases.

“Snoring is more than a bedtime annoyance and it shouldn’t be ignored. Patients need to seek treatment in the same way they would if they had sleep apnea, high blood pressure or other risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says lead study author Robert Deeb, M.D., with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford.

“Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that isolated snoring may not be as benign as first suspected. So instead of kicking your snoring bed partner out of the room or spending sleepless nights elbowing him or her, seek out medical treatment for the snorer.”

The study reveals changes in the carotid artery with snorers – even for those without sleep apnea – likely due to the trauma and subsequent inflammation caused by the vibrations of snoring.

Study results will be presented Friday at the 2013 Combined Sections Meeting of the Triological Society in Scottsdale, Ariz. It has been submitted to The Laryngoscope journal for publication.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) – a sleep disorder that occurs due to the collapse of the airway in the throat during sleep and causes loud snoring and periodic pauses in breathing – has long been linked to cardiovascular disease, along with a host of other serious health issues.

But the risk for cardiovascular disease may actually begin with snoring, long before it becomes OSA. Until now, there was little evidence in humans to show a similar connection between snoring and cardiovascular risk.

For the Henry Ford study, Dr. Deeb and senior study author Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., reviewed data for 913 patients who had been evaluated by the institution’s sleep center.

Patients, ages 18-50, who had participated in a diagnostic sleep study between December 2006 and January 2012 were included in the study. None of the participants had sleep apnea.

In all, 54 patients completed the snore outcomes survey regarding their snoring habits, as well as underwent a carotid artery duplex ultrasound to measure the intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries.

Carotid intima-media thickness, a measurement of the thickness of the innermost two layers of the arterial wall, may be used to detect the presence and to track the progression of atherosclerotic disease. Intima-media thickness is the first sign of carotid artery disease.

Compared to non-snorers, snorers were found to have a significantly greater intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries, the study finds.

The study also revealed no statistically significant differences in intima-media thickness for patients with or without some of the traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease – smoking, diabetes, hypertension or hypercholesterolemia.

“Snoring is generally regarded as a cosmetic issue by health insurance, requiring significant out-of-pocket expenses by patients. We’re hoping to change that thinking so patients can get the early treatment they need, before more serious health issues arise.”

The Henry Ford research team plans to conduct another long-term study on this topic, particularly to determine if there’s an increased incidence of cardiovascular events in patients who snore.

Along with Drs. Deeb and Yaremchuk, Henry Ford study co-authors are Paul Judge, M.D.; Ed Peterson, Ph.D.; and Judith C. Lin, M.D.

Funding: Henry Ford Hospital

SOURCE : henryford.com

=====================================================

Changes in the carotid artery are a precursor a hardening of the arteries, which can cause heart attacks and brain haemorrhages (pictured)

Changes in the carotid artery are a precursor a hardening of the arteries, which can cause heart attacks and brain haemorrhages (pictured)

Snorers ‘more at risk of heart attack than smokers or obese’

  • New connection between between ‘plain’ snoring – not  more severe sleep apnoea – and cardiovascular risk
  • Snorers more likely to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery that supplies the brain with blood
  • Snorers must seek treatment in the same way as those with high blood pressure or heart disease risk factors

By SOPHIE BORLAND

PUBLISHED: 13:01 GMT, 25 January 2013

Snorers are more likely to have a heart attack than smokers or the obese, say researchers.

Far from being merely a nuisance, snoring could be the early warning sign of life-threatening health problems, they warn.

US researchers believe that the condition may cause a thickening of the arteries which can lead to  brain haemorrhages, strokes and heart attacks.

Around a quarter of women and four in ten men are frequent snorers, although nearly half of us snore occasionally. Though it can interfere with our sleep – and that of our partners – it was not thought to cause any long-term health problems until recently.

American researchers claim the condition is as serious as having high blood pressure and urge snorers to seek medical advice.

A team from the University of Detroit found that frequent snorers are far more likely  to develop a thickening of the carotid artery – which supplies oxygenated blood to  the brain.

The condition has also been linked to hardening of other arteries in the body and can lead to heart attacks, strokes and brain haemorrhages.

Dr Robert Deeb, from the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, who led the research said: ‘Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting isolated snoring may not be as benign as first suspected.

‘So instead of kicking your snoring bed partner out of the room or spending sleepless nights elbowing him or her, seek out medical treatment for the snorer.’ Dr Deeb and his colleagues studied 54 men and women aged 18 to 50.

They had all filled in questionnaires about their snoring habits and then had ultrasound scans to look at the thickness of their carotid artery. The researchers found that the innermost layers of the artery walls were far thicker among the snorers than the other adults.

Dr Deeb added: ‘Snoring is generally regarded as a cosmetic issue by health insurance, requiring significant expenses by patients.

dailymail130125_001c

‘We are hoping to change that thinking so patients can get the early treatment they need, before more serious health issues arise.’

He said that the thickening of the artery may be caused by the constant vibrations of the snoring which results in inflammation.

The researchers now hope to carry out a larger study to see if snorers are more likely to have heart attacks and strokes. Dr Deeb, who has submitted his findings to the Laryngoscope journal for publication, said: ‘Snoring is more than a bedtime annoyance and it shouldn’t be ignored.

‘Patients need to seek treatment in the same way they would if they had sleep apnoea, high blood pressure or other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.’

Last year researchers from the University of Wisconsin, in the US, said that snorers were more likely to die from cancer.

The study of 1,500 adults found that moderate snorers were at 4.8 times greater risk of death.

SOURCE: dailymail.co.uk

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